Tag Archives: Star Trek

Bad Science Fiction

Only with TV logic can one imagine a future (Star Trek) in which people can create any thing they want any time they want (replicator) and live in a permanently imaginary world without any consequences (holodeck) and expect those same people to not only be not greedy, but socially conscious, egalitarian, and moral.

The theory goes something like this: give someone everything they want and magically they will grow tired of it, and no longer desire it. Or, restraint by indulgence.

It is a particularly odd belief system that proposes one can wean people off their addictions, and avoid others entirely, by offering addicts an endless supply of whatever it is they wanted in the first place.

Apparently, people can only be greedy if they have a limited supply of money, but not an endless supply of whatever it can buy.

Extrapolating further: people are only selfish when resources are finite not infinite, immoral only if there is some expectation they shouldn’t be, or cruel in real situations but not holographic ones.

This is all dismissed under the pretenses of some “enlightenment” but we are never told what the source of that enlightenment is. Like money, it is summarily written off with no explanation. Valuation clearly still exists in the future — it has too — but the economics are, of course, never revealed because they cannot exist, even in fantasy.

I actually like Star Trek, well The Original Series (TOS) before the others, but like everything else, up to and including evolution, the series is wildly and persistently fraudulent (openly deceptive) about the future it presents.

Star Trek as insignificant entertainment can be enjoyed, but its broader philosophical claims are provably false.

One example among dozens: evolution.

Ask any evolutionist — be a good Darwinist and pick one at random — and they will tell you that if you were rewind the “evolutionary clock” to zero and start over, the entire ecology of the Earth (plant and animal) would bear no resemblance to what we enjoy today. In fact, reset the clock five-and-a-half  billion years and you lose the very formation of the planet Earth itself far more many times than you would win it. As for life, it would not only be different, it would be wildly different. Start over a million times and you have a million bizarre landscapes, alien species without end, none resembling the other. Or worse, you wouldn’t get any life at all, given how infinitesimal the odds of cellular life are by blind chemistry. Across all those million attempts, you would never see humans emerge again — or dinosaurs, or whales, or birds, or amphibians, or insects. That is the bleak neverscape totally random mutations (real Darwinism) impose.

Yet, Star Trek demands not only did man evolve from primordial goo (against all chemical, genetic and mathematical evidence to the contrary) so did every other humanoid race in the universe.

They try to explain this by some ancestral world-seeding but even that fails in even the most forgiving evolutionary paradigm. But they don’t care: they’re selling evolution, so its actual efficacy is irrelevant. That’s how you know its not a show about science but scientism: philosophy masquerading as science.

Star Trek is really about atheism and technolatry — the worship not of God but of Man and his technology — and once you realize it, you see it for the religious nonsense it is.

The answer all paganism ultimately can ever give is “Because it is!”

It doesn’t matter how implausible a method or impossible a mechanism they hold up, the answer is ultimately “Because it is!” Gaps be damned. And there are a lot of gaps.

All questions cosmological, astronomical, geological, hydrological, chemical, molecular, genetic, anatomical and (even now in our age) economic, sexual, or moral are answered with “Because it is!”

The old scientific dictum that ‘everything kinda needs to make sense in relation to each other’ is now so shot through with colossal evolutionary contradictions, legions of exceptions, ad hoc constraints, and no few paradoxes, only a zealot holds on to it.

We have enough science now, and have had for about a century, to turn its razors on itself.

And that, friends, is a close shave most atheists do not want to have.


For the [Expletive] Record…

No Star Trek or Star Wars fan is angry at either the Star Trek reboot or the Star Wars films The Force Awakens or The Last Jedi because the filmmakers took the material in a new direction…

or because of “diversity”…

or because ILM has gotten so good at their job the special effects bordering on cinemagic…

or because new actors are inhabiting old roles…

or because cherished characters die…

or because…

or because…

or because…

The fans are angry because instead of just doing all these things wisely or reverently…

These new media-hacks willfully desecrated, stomped, gutted and spat on everything that made these franchises great in their day.

They (and you who support them) could have had everything they wanted without the scorn, the sneering or the cheap “crush everything you cherished” shock-treatment these illiterate script-rippers actually mistake as storytelling, character development, and proper franchise management and care.

Star Trek has been reduced to burlesque and caricature (eviscerated of the very intelligence, introspection, science and wit for which it was famous for five decades) while Star Wars has not been expanded at all. On the contrary, it has been ruthlessly crushed down to a parody, a duller counterfeit of itself (first trilogy).

Real filmmakers, real storytellers, real scriptwriters (not plagiarists), and real artists should have been pressed into service to catapult these franchises into their next golden age. These films would have made far more money at the box office, pleased the fans, and expanded both cinematic universes with dignity.

Not films. Not movies. Just media.

That’s all we are left with now.

Disney is the Canto Bight of media.

D7 K’Tinga Class Battlecruiser


The design of the Klingon K’t’inga-class, premiering in Star Trek: The Motion Picture, was based on the Koro-class battle cruiser for the movie’s immediate unrealized predecessor Star Trek: Phase II, which in turn was based on the D7-class, created by Matt Jefferies for Star Trek: The Original Series, which was itself based on the manta ray in both shape and color. (Star Trek: The Original Series Sketchbook) The studio model originally started out as belonging to the latter class. While the K’t’inga-class, like its D7-class predecessor, had only made a limited amount of appearances, together they have remained the quintessential Klingon starship design.


From Star Trek Wiki: D7 K’tinga Class Battlecruiser

The D7 Class Battlecruiser


The D7 class battle cruiser was a 23rd century warship originally designed and used by the Klingon Imperial Fleet, before being shared with the Romulan military during the late-2260s.

The D7 class Klingon battle cruiser served as the backbone of the fleet for several years during the 23rd century. (TOS-R: “Errand of Mercy”, et al.) Among the mission profiles designated for this class was that of scout ship (TOS-R: “Friday’s Child”).

By 2267, they were prominently featured in the Klingon Imperial Fleet, where they posed a serious threat to the security of the Federation and Starfleet. (TOS: “Elaan of Troyius”; TAS: “More Tribbles, More Troubles”).

The Romulan Star Empire later began using the same design by 2268 (TOS: “The Enterprise Incident”).

The K’t’inga-class battle cruiser began to replace the D7 class during the 2270s. The D7 was finally “retired decades” prior to 2377 (Star Trek: The Motion Picture; VOY: “Prophecy”).

Interest in these vessels by the Federation continued to appear well into the 2370s, as data on this class was commonly found within numerous Starfleet files. (TNG: “The Naked Now”, “The Last Outpost”, “Conspiracy”; VOY: “Drone”, “The Voyager Conspiracy”).


From Star Trek Wiki: Klingon D7

Star Trek – Galaxy Class


The Galaxy-class was a Starfleet vessel first introduced in the late 2350s. It was one of the largest and most powerful Federation starship classes of its time, with many serving in the Dominion War. This was the second known Galaxy-class starship, with the first being a little known class, which was in operation in the 2250s, that was mentioned in the Treaty of Armens. (TNG: “The Ensigns of Command“)


Design & Development

The Galaxy Class Starship Development Project began in the 2350s at Utopia Planitia Fleet Yards. (TNG: “Booby Trap“, “Eye of the Beholder“) Numerous technologies implemented on Galaxy-class starships were tested aboard earlier prototype vessels, including the Oberth-class USS Pegasus in the 2350s. (TNG: “The Pegasus“)

The warp core was designed at Outpost Seran-T-one on stardate 40052 by some of the most brilliant engineering minds in the Federation, including Leah Brahms of the Theoretical Propulsion Group. (TNG: “Booby Trap“)

Major component construction of Galaxy-class ships was carried out both in orbit and at ground based facilities.

Upon its launch, the Galaxy-class had become the most technologically sophisticated and complicated ship ever built by the Federation. (TNG: “Encounter at Farpoint“, “Lonely Among Us“, “Contagion“)

Commander William T. Riker‘s console on the bridge had some information on the dimensions of the USS Enterprise. This information might be true for her sister ships. The Enterprise had an overall length of 641 meters, an overall width of 473 meters, and an overall height of 190 meters. The gross vehicle mass of this ship was 5,000,000 tons. The ship had a standard crew complement of 1,012 persons, with a maximum evacuation capacity of 15,000 persons. The environmental standard on the ship was M-class. The maximum sustainable speed was warp 8.2, with the ship being able, temporarily, to travel at warp 9.8 for emergency situations. (TNG: “New Ground“, okudagram)


From Star Trek Wiki: Galaxy Class Starship